As long as the device you are sending to can create TCP or serial connections, the JNIOR should be able to send commands to it.

If you are starting from scratch with a JNIOR, you’ll want to download the JNIOR Support Tool. This application allows you to update JNIOR’s with INTEG software that you’ll need to let you send the text command.

Once you’ve downloaded the JNIOR Support Tool, you’ll need to download two update projects from our site, and update them to your JNIOR. This first update project is the Series 4 All-In-One update project. This is recommended for any new Series 4 JNIOR, as the update project gives JNIORs the most recent OS, along with some basic applications. The second update project is the Cinema update project. This is the application you’ll use to execute a macro from the JNIOR to the audio processor.

To update your JNIOR with an update project, here is a link to a post on our site that shows how to install Cinema. NOTE: Though the post shows how to install Cinema, its recommended you install the Series 4 All-In-One first, using the steps in that post.

Once the update projects have been published to your JNIOR, we’ll now need to create a device in the support tool to send to. In the support tool, you’ll go to the device tab and select add. You can select the device and rename it. After that you’ll now configure the settings of the device so we can send macros to it. To start you’ll select your device type, and if you see the device you want to send to there you’ll select it. If not you’ll select Raw Ethernet for a TCP connection or Raw Serial for a serial connection. You’ll then set the rest of the device configuration according to the device’s TCP or serial settings.

Once you finish setting the device information, you’ll then want to save the device file by clicking the Save As button. After that you’ll then publish the file to the JNIOR you are using by clicking the Publish to JNIOR button.

After you’ve done that, we’ll now create the macro that will be sent to the audio processor that will contain the text command. Going back to the support tool, you’ll go to the macro tab.

The first thing we’ll want to do here is click the “Link Devices” button at the top. Here we’ll select the device file we just created, so we can reference it in our action for the macro we are going to create.

After completing that, at the bottom left corner of the macro view and you’ll select add/macro. A new macro should populate the macro view, and you can then click on it and rename it. I’m going to name it ExampleMacro.

Once you’ve done that you’ll now go to the action view and select the add button there. A new action should appear in the action view. You can rename this if you’d like, and then we’ll want to select the device we previously created in the Support Tool to send to. Lastly, in the data field, you’ll want to enter the text command you wish to send to the device. If you are using a Raw Serial/Raw Ethernet device, make sure you include the termination string at the end of your text command for the device you are sending to.

After that, make sure you add the action we created to the macro we created. You do this by selecting the macro, then the action, followed by the arrow between the macro and action view.

Lastly, like we did with the device file, we’ll save this using the Save As button, followed by publishing it to the correct JNIOR using the Publish to JNIOR button.

Now that the JNIOR has a macro we created that will send the text command to your specified device, now all we need to do is configure the JNIOR so that it will send this macro when DIN1 goes ON. First thing we’ll want to do is go to the JNIOR Web UI by selecting the JNIOR in the beacon tab of the support tool. There you’ll right click it, and go to tools/open web page. Once on the JNIOR web page, you’ll go to the registry tab. On the registry tab, you’ll select AppData/Cinema/Triggers. Once there, you’ll go to Input1Macro and enter the name of the macro we created in the support tool. We named it ExampleMacro, but if you named it something different you’ll enter that name here. This should set the JNIOR so that when DIN1 on the JNIOR goes ON, the macro will activate.

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
JNIOR Supporter v0.1 Sep 30 2020 436 KB a37e8a2bafc86b3a434c46aea9dd7513

For a while now, we wanted to provide a cross-platform version of the JNIOR support tool to allow all users to access their JNIOR’s easily. There are also several aspects of the Support Tool that we wanted to improve upon. With that said, we are happy to release the JNIOR Supporter!

Features

Cross-Platform – The JNIOR Supporter provides cross-platform functionality. All users will enjoy the same experience regardless of the platform that they are using. The only requirement is that you have a valid Java Runtime Environment. .

New Interface – While looking familiar to the JNIOR support tool, the JNIOR Supporter has a new interface making it easier to view and interact with your JNIORs on the network. Information is displayed more openly to see issues or notices from JNIORs, and menus have been simplified to enhance ease of use.

Updated Features – The JNIOR Supporter introduces improved features such as: , sorted snapshots making them easier to find, and more displayed information to for JNIOR’s on the network.

View Logs – Users can now view logs from the support tool in a pop-up dialog by right clicking on a JNIOR in the Beacon tab instead of needing to reach the JNIOR’s web page

Sorted Snapshots – Snapshots are shown in a tree view and are shown in each of three categories allowing the user to easily find snapshots that we taken for a certain JNIOR based on serial number or hostname or based on when snapshots were taken by day.

Simultaneous Snapshots – Multiple Snapshots can now be taken simultaneously to speed up the process of backing up your site’s JNIOR ecosystem.

Multiple Update Projects – Multiple Update Projects can be opened at the same time so no longer have to close one Update Project to open another.  Care must be taken to not push conflicting updates to the same JNIOR.

Feedback

We want to know what you think of this new support tool. We know that change is not always easily accepted. Please let us know what you thought of it and how we can add/improve to this application. If you have questions or assistance with the application, feel free to contact us. You can do so by joining our support chat on our website, emailing us at support@integpg.com or calling the office at 724-933-9350.

JANOS has implemented a set of time zones that are available but in no means is this a complete list.  There are many territories in the world that either do not observe the time zone that they geographically belong to or they have different rules.  Some locations differ the time zone rules by 30 or even just 15 minutes.  Sometimes governments alter their policies and change the rules that have been in place for years or decades.

This article will describe how to create a new time zone with a DST rule as described in the JANOS Registry Documentation under section 9.2.

The clock subsystem is generally configured using the DATE command. JANOS defines a set of time zones for use in displaying local time. These time zones may or may not utilize Daylight Savings Time (DST).

As there are 24 hours on our clock one might expect that there needs to be only 24 time zones. This however is not the case as some areas offset their clocks by just 30 minutes. In addition, some areas utilize DST while others do not. The following is the default set of time zones. This can be displayed at any time using the DATE -T command.

This default list of time zones is likely incorrect for some areas across the globe. INTEG encourages users to let us know when a correction to the timezone tables might be appropriate. JANOS does provide a means by which you may define new time zones with or without DST rules. You may even correct an existing timezone. This is accomplished using one or more Time zones/<name> Registry entries.

Use of a website like timeanddate.com is very helpful for the validation and creation of time zones.

Here I will show you how to create a new Time Zone for Aukland New Zealand.  Timeanddate.com gives us all the information we need in this screenshot.

We see that they are currently observing Daylight Savings Time and will be throughout the beginning of next year since New Zealand is in the Southern Hemisphere.  So now we can follow the following format to build a registry key for the new time zone we will create.

reg Timezones/<name> = <offset>, <desc>, <AbbStd> [, <AbbDst>,
       <stMon>, <stDay>, <stDoW>, <stTime>,
       <endMon>, <endDay>, <endDoW>, <endTime>, <dstOfs>]

We will need to use the full format in order to get the daylight savings time rules implemented. To do this we can enter the following at the command line.

reg timezones/NewZealand = "+1200, New Zealand/Aukland, NZST, NZDT, 
       SEP, 27, SUN, 200, 
       APR, 5, SUN, 200, 60"

The registry tab could also have been used to create the key. That would look like this…

In either case we get the same result. We can now issue the date -t command to see our newly created time zone.

A reboot is needed to complete the registration of our newly created time zone.  After the reboot there is only one more thing to do.  Tell the JNIOR to use it.  For example, date NZST.

There you go!  The new time zone has been created and the JNIOR is now using it.  As mentioned above, it is recommended to tell INTEG of missing or incorrect time zones so that we can put it in the JNIOR but creating a custom time zone will get your JNIOR to start using the new rules immediately. 

As always, thanks for using the JNIOR!

Serial Control Plus is an application that comes pre-installed on all JNIORs. It allows you to connect either serially or through TCP to a JNIOR, and give it commands to activate the JNIOR’s I/O. This post will explain how to setup and use Serial Control Plus on your JNIOR.

To start, as mentioned before Serial Control Plus is already pre-installed on all JNIORs. To activate it, you need to go to the JNIOR DCP. This can be accessed by either right clicking the JNIOR in the JNIOR Support Tool and going to Tools/Open Web Page, or by typing the JNIOR’s IP address into the URL of your computer’s web browser. Once on the DCP, you’ll go to the applications section on the configuration tab and click the checkbox next to Serial Control Plus and reboot your JNIOR. This will allow you to use Serial Control Plus on that JNIOR.

Once you have activated the Serial Control Plus application on your JNIOR, you can now send commands to the JNIOR through it. We are going to open the command line from the support tool to activate commands on this JNIOR for this example. To open the command line from the Support Tool, you’ll go to the Tools bar at the top of the Support Tool and select Command Line.

Once you have the command line open, you’ll need to configure the settings of the command line to send commands to the JNIOR. To have the right settings to communicate with the JNIOR, we need to select how we communicate to the JNIOR. Serial Control Plus can communicate with the JNIOR two ways. Either you can connect to the JNIOR with a serial connection or a TCP connection.

To connect serially with the JNIOR, you need to plug a serial cable into the Aux Port of the JNIOR. Once you do that we need to select the correct settings in the command line window. As in the picture below, next to the connect button for the connection type you’ll select COM, baud type is 9600, Data bits is 8, Stop bits is 1, Parity is none, and hardware/software is set to none. For the Option drop-down, select all the choices.

To connect through TCP, you just need the JNIOR to be on the network to connect. As in the picture below next to the connect button for the connection type you’ll select TCP/IP, you’ll set the JNIOR’s IP, and the Port to connect on is 9202. For the Option drop-down, select all the choices.

Once you’ve decided on your connection type and configured the command line accordingly, you should be able to send commands to the JNIOR. Here are commands for controlling and monitoring I/O.

Controlling I/O

The following commands can be used to close, open and pulse outputs.

cX: Close the output (relay is “on” closing the contact)
where x = 1 through 8 for the internal relay outputs on the JNIOR
and x = +1 through +8 for the external relay outputs on the 4 Relay Output Expansion Modules

oX: Open the output (relay is “off” opening the contact)
where x = 1 through 8 for the internal relay outputs on the JNIOR
and x = +1 through +8 for the external relay outputs on the 4 Relay Output Expansion Modules

p=yyy Pulse duration (milliseconds) and is used in conjunction with the ‘close’ or ‘open’ command


Examples:
c2p=1000 close output 2 for 1 second and then open again
c+2p=1000 close output 10 for 1 second and then open again
o3p=10000 open output 3 for 10 seconds and then close again
c* Close all outputs at the same time (includes internal and external)
o* Open all outputs at the same time (includes internal and external)


These commands can be abbreviated and used in combination, such as:
c1 close relay output 1
c+1 close relay output 9 (first output on first expansion module)
c+5 close relay output 13 (first output on second expansion module)
c1+1+5 combination of the above all in one command
c1234 close relay outputs 1 through 4
c1368 close relay outputs 1, 3, 6, 8
o125 open relay outputs 1, 2, 5
c1+1p=1000 close relay outputs 1, 9 and pulse each for 1 second simultaneously

Monitoring I/O

Whenever an input (or output) changes status (low-to-high or high-to-low), the following is sent out by the JNIOR:

INx=1 Input x (1 – 8) has gone high (on)
OUTx=1 Output x (1 – 16) has gone high (on)
INx=0 Input x (1 – 8) has gone low (off)
OUTx=1 Output x (1 – 16) has gone low (off)


The default setting for the Registry Key AppData/Serial_Control/SendCounts is false. If you change this key to true and reboot, with each message stating the input status, a count value will also be included. Whenever an input changes status (low-to-high or high-to-low), the following is sent out by the JNIOR:

INx=1,yyy Input x (1 – 8) has gone high (on), counter value = yyy
INx=0,yyy Input x (1 – 8) has gone low (off), counter value = yyy


Note: These monitoring messages are sent out individually over the serial port or Ethernet. The JNIOR does not report the status of more than one input/counter in the same message.

With this, you should now be able to use Serial Control Plus to control and monitor a JNIOR’s I/O!

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Tasker v3.3 Jul 30 2020 1 MB 5783b3bda071222b48775e5ffb9e4b3d
  • [+] adding duplicate instance check
  • [+] variables that start with :: shall be global
  • [+] add TCP Recv
  • [+] add TCP Close
  • [+] new execute script action
  • [+] uses new scripting engine
  • [!] fixed issue where dst timezone was not being logged
  • [+] adding action to prepend to file
  • [+] adding retry logic to external identifier objects. included creating external identifier parent class
  • [+] adding action to copy file
  • [+] adding action to move file
  • [+] add ascii tcp and serial servers for tasker control
  • [~] now preventing spaces in workspace names. current workspace files with spaces will be renamed with an UNDERSCORE

Go to the Tasker Application page for more information. The Tasker Knowledge-base has helpful information on how to use the features in Tasker.

Tasker 3.2 June 18, 2020

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Tasker v3.2 Jun 18 2020 958 KB 953712536000b330ad267047b7ee274d
  • + added 4-20ma modules
  • + added 10v modules
  • + added email send attachment option

Go to the Tasker Application page for more information. The Tasker Knowledge-base has helpful information on how to use the features in Tasker.

Tasker 3.1 May 1, 2020

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Tasker v3.1 May 05 2020 942 KB 47e03374e8a8791ec0a922f38e62f174
  • Added If / Else Block Task Action
  • Added While Loop Task Action
  • Added SNMP Trap Task Action - Tutorial
  • Help pages are in progress
  • Upload and download workspaces
  • Delete a workspace (Workspace is backed up)

Go to the Tasker Application page for more information. The Tasker Knowledge-base has helpful information on how to use the features in Tasker.

Tasker 3.0 RELEASED! April 20, 2020

It has been a while since Tasker was released. Tasker was a quick attempt at making a replacement for the Task Manager application that has been around for more than a decade, starting on the Series 3.

Ample time has now been taken to create a fully capable application that will be every bit as functional as Task Manager but offer the benefits of a rewrite, using configuration files and the latest web technology.

Some of the changes and new features are as follows:

  • Faster– The tasks are executed much faster and the triggers and schedule are monitored in real-time instead of once every 5 – 10 seconds.
  • Workspaces - Separate configuration logic into multiple workspaces. Then multiple workspaces can be loaded on the JNIOR at the same time.
  • Tasks are now separate from triggers. In Task Manager a Task was created and a Trigger was configured to get the Task to execute. In Tasker 3.0 Tasks are a separate entity that can be executed several different way including manual execution from the configuration page and being requested via an ASCII TCP connection.
  • Tasks can now send data via an Ethernet connection. To do this, a Device must be created so that the action can specify which device to send the data to. Multiple devices can be configured.
  • New Actions – We implemented actions that were previously available in Task Manager but are introducing many new actions like external module control, TCP communication and control structures.
  • Drag n Drop – Drag and Drop functionality makes it easier to design your Task logic.
  • Signals are now created to assign a specific property of a I/O point or sensor a name. The name can then be used in Tasks, Triggers or Loggers.
  • Loggers can be created to define the file name and schema or what data should be logged to that file. Each line in a Logger will be prepended with a timestamp followed by a comma. Loggers also allow you to define the number of files that should be kept with the given naming pattern. Name patterns can include date patterns. This will help you create a file per day for example.
  • Schedule – The schedule has additional options.
  • JSON Configuration files are used now instead of registry keys. Registry keys were limiting in size. The Series 3 could only store 255 characters in a registry key. It is much easier to upload configuration files to other JNIORs to replicate setups.
  • User Interface – The User Interface is now a native HTML application that uses the latest web technology. The latest web technology uses native HTML controls and Web-sockets to communicate with the JNIOR from your browser. This will allow accessibility over remote connections as long as port 80 is available. This is now consistent with the communication method used by the DCP. Task Manager had always used Java Applets. The Java Applets have not been able to launch in browsers for several years as they became frowned upon as security vulnerabilities.

This was just a short list of changes and new features. The documentation for Tasker should explain these topics as well as many others. If there is anything you don't understand please reach out to us for help. Additionally, if you have any suggestions or need the JNIOR to do something specific for you, please let us know.

For more information go to the Tasker Page

The series 3 JNIORs used the Java Applet as a GUI. Years ago the browsers stopped supporting Java Applets due to security concerns. You are no longer able to open the series 3 Java Applet GUI in most browsers. You can still access it by launching it locally since it is installed as part of the JNIOR Support Tool. The security concerns over java applets are not present when launching the Java Application locally. Here is how to access the Java Applet for a JNIOR.

NOTE: The Java Applet GUI should only be used with series 3 JNIORs.

First, make sure you have the JNIOR support tool downloaded. Here is a link for it.

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
JNIOR Support Tool v7.10 Jul 15 2020 13 MB 4fd5a1b0617a59a7f6802663ec3f789e

Once you have downloaded the Support Tool, you’ll want to open it and find the JNIOR you wish to access the Java Applet for in the Beacon tab. Then by right clicking it, you’ll then go to Tools/Classic Monitor, Configuration, Control Application option and select it.

After selecting this for, the Java Applet for your JNIOR should open.

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Slaving Service v2.0 Jul 23 2020 183 KB e6f139ce51cdf79c5c05845285cd7eb4
  • [+] Added the ability to control the inputs based on Local or Remote I/O
  • [+] Added a section to the web page for configuring the inputs
Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Grapher v4.1 Jun 18 2020 788 KB 75e992513636e0c45c7aa7f71d8c1303

! Fixed bugs.

Grapher 4.0 - A change in navigation August 23, 2019

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Grapher v4.0 Aug 22 2019 783 KB a7967fd9878171af565ff1faf677ae14

Several changes affecting how you navigate in time.

Added the ability to change the configured duration view of the graph. Previously the default was a hard-coded 4 hours. Once you brought up the graph you could have used the mouse wheel to zoom out or zoom in. The graph would always load showing the past 4 hours.

In this version we removed the ability to zoom in and out using the mouse wheel. We also removed dragging the graph in the future or past using the mouse. This was done because it was noted that too often the mouse is accidentally being used to modify the graph view.

Since the mouse interaction was removed to zoom and pan, we added buttons below the graph the facilitate the ability to move forward and backward in time.

The fast step buttons move the graph forward or backward by the entire duration. If you are looking at today, as shown below, pressing the fast backwards button will show you yesterday. The single step buttons move by 1/4 the duration. Looking at 24 hours and pressing the single step buttons will move the graph by 6 hours.

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
JNIOR Support Tool v7.10 Jul 15 2020 13 MB 4fd5a1b0617a59a7f6802663ec3f789e

! Corrected an issue where opening an update project would encounter a non-empty temp folder.

+ Added the ability to open multiple Device files

+ Added the ability to open multiple Macro files

+ Added the ability to open multiple Update Projects

! addresses an issue where the Update Notification was always being shown at startup, even when the most recent version was on the JNIOR.

JNIOR Support Tool 7.9 May 16, 2019

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
JNIOR Support Tool v7.9 May 16 2019 13 MB 2c22f26f4e87d724e0f7c918095eb8c0
  • The JNIOR Support Tool version 7.9 addresses an issue with new installs.  The C:\INTEG\JNIOR Support Tool directory was not getting created upon install.  This would prevent the Support Tool from opening.
  • Also in this update is a selection for the new Barco Series 4 projector.

The following post talks about entering the processor bootloader.  Entering the bootloader could have unintended consequences should the wrong commands be entered.  Proceed at your own risk.

Note, this is for a series 3 JNIOR that went out of production in 2015. You can upgrade to Series 4 JNIORs easily in most cases.

Most JNIOR3 batteries should be dead and therefore removing power to reboot should restore the default accounts. If the battery is still doing its job you can force your way in using the following:

  1. Connect USB-to-Serial cable to COM/RS-232 port.
  2. Open Terminal program of your choice (Support Tool). Serial settings are 115200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and No Parity. No hardware buffer control. We are hoping that the DTR line (pin 4) is wired through the cable and is asserted by default.
  3. Access the JNIOR and prove to yourself that you cannot log in. Try jnior:jnior and admin:admin.
  4. With jumper (or screwdriver) short jumper next to COM port briefly (1/2 second).
  5. Immediately hit repeated (at least 3 or so) ENTER keystrokes. The bootloader banner should appear.
  6. Enter: B 02 <ENTER>
  7. Enter: F 00 0000 0100 <ENTER>
  8. Enter: E <ENTER>
  9. The JNIOR should reboot. Note the above switches to the Block for the Heap Memory (Bank 2); Clears the first 256 bytes of the Heap damaging its structure; And, then Exits restarting the system.
  10. Note in the dialog the indication “Blast HEAP”. This restores the original /etc/passwd file with the default credentials.
  11. Eventually log in using jnior:jnior

If shorting the jumper pins or inserting the jumper briefly does not reboot the JNIOR and accept your ENTER keystrokes, then DTR is not wired or asserted.

This test was done using Putty on an Ubuntu system with an old USB-to_Serial adapter.

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Tasker v3.2 Jun 18 2020 958 KB 953712536000b330ad267047b7ee274d
  • + added 4-20ma modules
  • + added 10v modules
  • + added email send attachment option

Go to the Tasker Application page for more information. The Tasker Knowledge-base has helpful information on how to use the features in Tasker.

Tasker 3.1 May 1, 2020

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Tasker v3.1 May 05 2020 942 KB 47e03374e8a8791ec0a922f38e62f174
  • Added If / Else Block Task Action
  • Added While Loop Task Action
  • Added SNMP Trap Task Action - Tutorial
  • Help pages are in progress
  • Upload and download workspaces
  • Delete a workspace (Workspace is backed up)

Go to the Tasker Application page for more information. The Tasker Knowledge-base has helpful information on how to use the features in Tasker.

Tasker 3.0 RELEASED! April 20, 2020

It has been a while since Tasker was released. Tasker was a quick attempt at making a replacement for the Task Manager application that has been around for more than a decade, starting on the Series 3.

Ample time has now been taken to create a fully capable application that will be every bit as functional as Task Manager but offer the benefits of a rewrite, using configuration files and the latest web technology.

Some of the changes and new features are as follows:

  • Faster– The tasks are executed much faster and the triggers and schedule are monitored in real-time instead of once every 5 – 10 seconds.
  • Workspaces - Separate configuration logic into multiple workspaces. Then multiple workspaces can be loaded on the JNIOR at the same time.
  • Tasks are now separate from triggers. In Task Manager a Task was created and a Trigger was configured to get the Task to execute. In Tasker 3.0 Tasks are a separate entity that can be executed several different way including manual execution from the configuration page and being requested via an ASCII TCP connection.
  • Tasks can now send data via an Ethernet connection. To do this, a Device must be created so that the action can specify which device to send the data to. Multiple devices can be configured.
  • New Actions – We implemented actions that were previously available in Task Manager but are introducing many new actions like external module control, TCP communication and control structures.
  • Drag n Drop – Drag and Drop functionality makes it easier to design your Task logic.
  • Signals are now created to assign a specific property of a I/O point or sensor a name. The name can then be used in Tasks, Triggers or Loggers.
  • Loggers can be created to define the file name and schema or what data should be logged to that file. Each line in a Logger will be prepended with a timestamp followed by a comma. Loggers also allow you to define the number of files that should be kept with the given naming pattern. Name patterns can include date patterns. This will help you create a file per day for example.
  • Schedule – The schedule has additional options.
  • JSON Configuration files are used now instead of registry keys. Registry keys were limiting in size. The Series 3 could only store 255 characters in a registry key. It is much easier to upload configuration files to other JNIORs to replicate setups.
  • User Interface – The User Interface is now a native HTML application that uses the latest web technology. The latest web technology uses native HTML controls and Web-sockets to communicate with the JNIOR from your browser. This will allow accessibility over remote connections as long as port 80 is available. This is now consistent with the communication method used by the DCP. Task Manager had always used Java Applets. The Java Applets have not been able to launch in browsers for several years as they became frowned upon as security vulnerabilities.

This was just a short list of changes and new features. The documentation for Tasker should explain these topics as well as many others. If there is anything you don't understand please reach out to us for help. Additionally, if you have any suggestions or need the JNIOR to do something specific for you, please let us know.

For more information go to the Tasker Page

Extend the life of your logs. Use the Log Archiver to compress backups to an archive.

The archive that is used is determined based on the log name that is about to be archived. There are several known system logs that will be archived in a system.zip archive. Other log files use the beginning part of the file name to determine the archive name. tasker.log and tasker-tasks.log will go to the tasker.zip archive.

Each archive will grow to a maximum size. The archiver will try to remove an entry once the maximum size is reached. The entry to be removed is determined by trying to find the oldest entry for a file that has more than one copy. If the oldest entry is the only entry of its kind then it will not be removed.

Applications must use a .log.bak file naming convention for this application to archive the backup log files. JANOS uses this concept but the Java applications have been using a rolling file concept for quite some time. The logging concept in the applications will change as the applications are updated. This application will initially start archiving the system log files.

The maximum size is configurable. It is 128 KB by default. It can be change to a value between 32 KB and 512 KB. To configure this setting you will edit the AppData/LogArchiver/MaxArchiveSizeInKB registry key.

The Max Archive Size in KB registry key

The application must be set to run on boot. You will use the Applications section in the Configuration tab in the DCP to ensure that the Log Archiver application is set to run on boot.

Se the Log Archiver application to run on boot

Here is a good example of how the oldest entry is not always removed.

Screenshot showing the system.zip contents and the system.zip filesize

This is the honeypot unit. Its our publicly accessible unit that we use to map source locations for failed login attempts to the telnet port. Here you can see that the jniorboot-202004080118.log file is by far the oldest entry. It should have been removed many times but because it is the only jniorboot*.log, it is saved. The jniorsys-202005110533.log file also should have been removed but since it is the only jniorsys*.log, it hasn’t. The failed login attempts are quite numerous, thus filling up the access.log and causing it to be archived many times. The other thing we notice here is that we have 14 files in this archive and the archive size is only 120 KB!

Screenshot of honeypot.integpg.com

Tasker is an add-on application. This means that Tasker is not loaded on the JNIOR before we ship it. This may change in the future.

To load Tasker you will need to get the JNIOR Support Tool and the Tasker update project.

Once you have installed the JNIOR Support Tool, open it and go to the Update tab. Here we will open the Tasker update project that was downloaded. Do not unzip the update project file. You should see the following…

This image shows the Update project for Tasker version 3.1 from May 5th 2020
This image shows the Update project for Tasker version 3.1 from May 5th 2020

Click Publish and select the JNIOR or JNIORs that you wish the load the Tasker Application on to. The Update project will run until all of the selected JNIORs have been updated.

Once complete, you can go to the Tasker Web Application in your browser. Simply go to http://JNIOR_IP_ADDRESS/tasker.

Name Version Release Date Size MD5
Tasker v3.1 May 05 2020 942 KB 47e03374e8a8791ec0a922f38e62f174
  • Added If / Else Block Task Action
  • Added While Loop Task Action
  • Added SNMP Trap Task Action – Tutorial
  • Help pages are in progress
  • Upload and download workspaces
  • Delete a workspace (Workspace is backed up)

Go to the Tasker Application page for more information. The Tasker Knowledge-base has helpful information on how to use the features in Tasker.

Tasker 3.0 RELEASED! April 20, 2020

It has been a while since Tasker was released. Tasker was a quick attempt at making a replacement for the Task Manager application that has been around for more than a decade, starting on the Series 3.

Ample time has now been taken to create a fully capable application that will be every bit as functional as Task Manager but offer the benefits of a rewrite, using configuration files and the latest web technology.

Some of the changes and new features are as follows:

  • Faster– The tasks are executed much faster and the triggers and schedule are monitored in real-time instead of once every 5 – 10 seconds.
  • Workspaces - Separate configuration logic into multiple workspaces. Then multiple workspaces can be loaded on the JNIOR at the same time.
  • Tasks are now separate from triggers. In Task Manager a Task was created and a Trigger was configured to get the Task to execute. In Tasker 3.0 Tasks are a separate entity that can be executed several different way including manual execution from the configuration page and being requested via an ASCII TCP connection.
  • Tasks can now send data via an Ethernet connection. To do this, a Device must be created so that the action can specify which device to send the data to. Multiple devices can be configured.
  • New Actions – We implemented actions that were previously available in Task Manager but are introducing many new actions like external module control, TCP communication and control structures.
  • Drag n Drop – Drag and Drop functionality makes it easier to design your Task logic.
  • Signals are now created to assign a specific property of a I/O point or sensor a name. The name can then be used in Tasks, Triggers or Loggers.
  • Loggers can be created to define the file name and schema or what data should be logged to that file. Each line in a Logger will be prepended with a timestamp followed by a comma. Loggers also allow you to define the number of files that should be kept with the given naming pattern. Name patterns can include date patterns. This will help you create a file per day for example.
  • Schedule – The schedule has additional options.
  • JSON Configuration files are used now instead of registry keys. Registry keys were limiting in size. The Series 3 could only store 255 characters in a registry key. It is much easier to upload configuration files to other JNIORs to replicate setups.
  • User Interface – The User Interface is now a native HTML application that uses the latest web technology. The latest web technology uses native HTML controls and Web-sockets to communicate with the JNIOR from your browser. This will allow accessibility over remote connections as long as port 80 is available. This is now consistent with the communication method used by the DCP. Task Manager had always used Java Applets. The Java Applets have not been able to launch in browsers for several years as they became frowned upon as security vulnerabilities.

This was just a short list of changes and new features. The documentation for Tasker should explain these topics as well as many others. If there is anything you don't understand please reach out to us for help. Additionally, if you have any suggestions or need the JNIOR to do something specific for you, please let us know.

For more information go to the Tasker Page

One of the useful things about Tasker, is that it can include communicating with other devices within its tasks. This is possible by including a networks action, but before those actions can be used devices need to be added to a Tasker application. This post will explain how to create devices to be used in actions for tasks.

To start, we’ll begin by going to the devices tab of the Tasker application.

Here we can select the “Add Device” button which brings up a dialog box to add a device to the current workspace. 

In this dialog, two things need to be defined to create the device. This first value needed is the name of the device. The second value needed is the device type, which can either be an Ethernet or SNMP Device. Depending which Device type you choose changes the what information you can configure for the device after creating it.

Creating an Ethernet Device

If the Ethernet Device type was selected, the configurable option for the created device should look like this:

Two values of the Ethernet Device need configured in order to use it in a Task action, the IP Address and the TCP Port values. These need to be set to the IP Address and TCP Port values on the device, so that when they are used in actions, the JNIOR can properly communicate with the device. Another post has an example of using a TCP Send with an Ethernet Device.

Creating an SNMP Device

If the SNMP Device type was selected, the configurable option for the created device should look like this:

Three values of the SNMP Device need configured in order to use it in a  Task action which are, the IP Address, the UDP Port, and the Community Name. These are needed for the JNIOR to connect to the SNMP Device and you obtain them from the SNMP Device. A different post shows how to use a SNMP Device with an SNMP Trap.

With this, you should have created devices in Tasker that can be implemented in actions.

Schedules add functionality to task created in Tasker because it gives them the ability to place a time for when the tasks should occur. This post will explain the different types of schedules that can be created, and how they can configured.

Creating a Schedule

To start, we’ll go to the Schedule tab of the Tasker application in order to create a schedule.

After going to the Schedule tab, the first thing to do is add a schedule in the Schedule tab. After giving it a name, the new schedule will have 3 parts to it, the name, the rules, and the task to be executed from it.

The Name section already has the name you gave it when it was created, but that section also gives you the options to edit the name, have the schedule enabled or not by checking the checkbox, or delete the schedule.

The Task Name section allow you to select a task from a drop down list or manual enter the name of a task that will execute at when the schedule is set.

Adding Rules to a Schedule

The Schedule Rules section is what allows the schedule to determine the times that which the Task selected in the Task Name section will execute. Clicking the “Add Rule” button opens the rules dialog box.

When adding rules to a schedule, there are 4 types of rules you can add, reboot, sunrise, sunset, and schedule. The first three are similar, where you simply click on the Schedule Type and select sunrise, sunset, or reboot from the drop down list. This will make it so that the task you set with that schedule will run at either sunrise, sunset, or on reboot, depending on which one you picked and no other options need to be selected. 

Picking the Schedule option in the Schedule Type, lets you set the custom options for creating a schedule. The first option after the Schedule Type is the Start On option. This lets you select what day the schedule will begin to activate. Once the date reaches the day you selected it will run that schedule from then on. 

After that is the Start Time option. This allows you to select from the hours and minutes in a 24 hour format when the scheduled task will begin. 

Next is the Repeat Every option, which lets you how often in a time interval you want the task to reoccur. It adds a End Time option once a value has been added to the Repeat Every option. It can be set similar to the Start Time option that will decide when the Task will stop repeating by. 

After that is the Date Selection Type option, which lets you choose between letting the task execute None (Which is one time), Daily, Weekly, or Monthly. Depending on what option you choose, this changes the Recur Every option. Picking the None option  will make the task only run on the Start On date you picked. The Daily option will let you choose how many days between the task should run. The Weekly option will let you choose what days of the week the task should run. The Monthly option will let you choose what days of  month the task should run.

With this, you should be able to assign schedules for any task you have created.

Workspaces are files that contain configuration for Tasker. Tasks, Devices, Loggers, Signals, Triggers, and Schedules are all saved in a Workspace file.

Multiple Workspace files can be loaded on the JNIOR at the same time allowing you to load more complex logic. Using multiple Workspaces allows you to logically group the features together that rely on each other.

Tasker will not have any Workapces loaded when it is first loaded. You will be presented with a screen alerting you to that fact and telling you that you must create a new Workspace.

You can click the green button to Create a new Workspace or use the New option in the File menu.

Once a Workspace is created and saved the screen will appear differently the next time you visit Tasker. Here we have created two Workspaces to illustrate this.

You can now click on of the Workspace files or use the Open option in the File menu.

The above post was a brief explanation covering how to create and open Workspaces in Tasker. If you have any additional questions you can check out the Tasker Knowledgebase.

To get SNMP to run on boot we need to set the Run key in the JNIOR registry. You can do this manually or by checking the checkbox next the SNMP.

A reboot WILL be required after changing the selection here.